100 Years Ago Today

A History Of Events And Happenings From Exactly One Hundred Years Ago

Archive for the month “May, 2012”

Dock Strike In England

England has been wracked by strikes in the past few years as groups of workers previously unrepresented have organized and fight for better working conditions. A transportation strike in London, England affecting dock workers began May 24th. Some work continued at the docks but things generally were at a standstill. Many ships are delayed and unable to discharge cargo. Much meat and other perishable foodstuffs will be a total loss. The police are at the docks inspecting idle cargo and keeping order.

On May 31, 1912 these London police found a live monkey in a cargo hold.

London police with apprehended suspected stowaway – May 31, 1912

Photo: MAY 31, 1912

Dock Strike In England

England has been wracked by strikes in the past few years as groups of workers previously unrepresented have organized and fight for better working conditions. A transportation strike in London, England affecting dock workers began May 24th. Some work continued at the docks but things generally were at a standstill.  Many ships are delayed and unable to discharge cargo. Much meat and other perishable foodstuffs will be a total loss. The police are at the docks inspecting idle cargo and keeping order.

On May 31, 1912 these London police found a live monkey in a cargo hold.

London police with apprehended suspected stowaway - May 31, 1912
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Masters Sold In Paris

Adele de Cassin became the Marquise Landolfo-Carcano through marriage in 1896.

On May 31, 1912 the Marquise sold part of her collection of old masters in Paris, France. A 1633 Rembrandt portrait of the artist’s sister went for $73,000. Reuben’s “Christ” was offered at $16,000 but went for $13,500. Other pieces went relatively cheap : Daumier’s “The Pork Butcher” – $1,300, Rousseau’s “The Hut In The Forest” – $800, Delacroix’s “Sketch of Himself” – $440 and Corot’s “The Temple” – $210.

Adele de Cassin – Marquise Landolfo-Carcano 1868 by Ricard Gustave

Photo: MAY 31, 1912

Masters Sold In Paris

Adele de Cassin became the Marquise Landolfo-Carcano through marriage in 1896.

On May 31, 1912 the Marquise sold part of her collection of old masters in Paris, France. A 1633 Rembrandt portrait of the artist's sister went for $73,000. Reuben's "Christ" was offered at $16,000 but went for $13,500. Other pieces went relatively cheap : Daumier's "The Pork Butcher" - $1,300, Rousseau's "The Hut In The Forest" - $800, Delacroix's "Sketch of Himself" - $440 and Corot's "The Temple" - $210.

Adele de Cassin - Marquise Landolfo-Carcano 1868 by Ricard Gustave

Motorcycle Racers In Utah

The first bike race was held in 1868 near Paris, France. As the popularity of the sport grew, bicycle races were staged at existing harness or horse tracks. Soon special banked wooden tracks were built called velodromes. By 1895 there were about 100 velodromes staging regular races. Madison Square Garden was actually originally built as a track racing venue.Motorcycle racing began as early as 1894 with the European Paris-Rouen event where both cars and motorcycles raced side by side. The Federation Internationale de Motorcycles Clubs based in Paris held the first European Grand Prix in Patzau, Austro-Hungary in July 1906. In 1910 the first motordrome, built for automobile and motorcycle racing, was built in Los Angeles, California.

The Los Angeles Motordrome – 1910

The Indian Motorcycle Company was founded in 1897 in Springfield, Massachusetts though the name “Indian” wasn’t labeled on a bike until 1902. In 1903 Indian set the world motorcycle speed record of 56 MPH. In 1904 the company introduced the deep red color that would become its trademark. In 1905 Indian built its first V-twin factory racer and in following years made a strong showing in racing and record-breaking. In the Isle of Man TT in 1911 Indian riders finished first, second and third.

On May 31, 1912 Team Indian posed for a photograph at the Wandamere Motordrome, Utah

Photo: MAY 31, 1912</p><br /><br />
<p>Motorcycle Racers In Utah</p><br /><br />
<p>The first bike race was held in 1868 near Paris, France. As the popularity of the sport grew, bicycle races were staged at existing harness or horse tracks. Soon special banked wooden tracks were built called velodromes. By 1895 there were about 100 velodromes staging regular races. Madison Square Garden was actually originally built as a track racing venue.</p><br /><br />
<p>Motorcycle racing began as early as 1894 with the European Paris-Rouen event where both cars and motorcycles raced side by side. The Federation Internationale de Motorcycles Clubs based in Paris held the first European Grand Prix in Patzau, Austro-Hungary in July 1906. In 1910 the first motordrome, built for automobile and motorcycle racing, was built in Los Angeles, California.</p><br /><br />
<p>The Los Angeles Motordrome - 1910 : http://www.insidesocal.com/history/motordromecard.jpg</p><br /><br />
<p>The Indian Motorcycle Company was founded in 1897 in Springfield, Massachusetts though the name "Indian" was labeled on a bike until 1902. In 1903 Indian set the world motorcycle speed record of 56 MPH. In 1904 the company introduced the deep red color that would become its trademark. In 1905 Indian built its first V-twin factory racer and in following years made a strong showing in racing and record-breaking. In the Isle of Man TT in 1911 Indian riders finished first, second and third. </p><br /><br />
<p>On May 31, 1912 Team Indian posed for a photograph at the Wandamere Motordrome, Utah

Shop Girl’s Lucky Day

Lulu Church worked as a shop girl for a store in Los Angeles.
On May 31, 1912 Ms Church was hurrying to work when she lost her hat. She was afraid if she stopped for it, she would be fired for being late. She got permission from her manager to go and retrieve the lost hat but by the time Ms Church arrived, it had been ran over by an automobile. The tattered chapeau was being held by 3 men in front of a fancy hotel. Ms Church was surprised and delighted when she asked for her hat back because the 3 gentlemen were wealthy manufacturers and gave her $50 to buy a new hat. Ms. Church spent the entire amount on a new hat for herself.

“I always wanted one like that but never believed I would have one.”

A 1912 ladies’ hat

Photo: MAY 31, 1912</p><br /><br /><br />
<p>Shop Girl's Lucky Day</p><br /><br /><br />
<p>Lulu Church worked as a shop girl for a store in Los Angeles. </p><br /><br /><br />
<p>On May 31, 1912 Ms Church was hurrying to work when she lost her hat. She was afraid if she stopped for it, she would be fired for being late. She got permission from her manager to go and retrieve the lost hat but by the time Ms Church arrived, it had been ran over by an automobile. The tattered chapeau was being held by 3 men in front of a fancy hotel. Ms Church was surprised and delighted when she asked for her hat back because the 3 gentlemen were wealthy manufacturers and gave her $50 to buy a new hat. Ms. Church spent the entire amount on a new hat for herself. </p><br /><br /><br />
<p>"I always wanted on like that but never believed I would have one."</p><br /><br /><br />
<p>A 1912 ladies' hat

Issued May 31, 1912

The Pope Manufacturing Company started making bicycles under the Columbia brand name in 1877. By 1896 it was the leading producer of bicycles in the US. In 1897 they started producing an electric automobile. By 1899 the Electric Vehicle division had spun off as the independent Columbia Automobile Company but it was acquired by the Electric Vehicle Company which had hoped to place electric powered cabs in every major US city. In 1910 the United States Motor Company was organized as a selling company to represent various manufacturers who were having trouble getting financial backing. These included : Maxwell, Stoddard-Dayton, Courier Car Company, Columbia Automobile Company, Brush Motor Car Company and Alden Sampson Trucks. In 1912 Columbia cars are still being turned out. A Knight motor was a type of engine that used sleeve valves instead of poppet valves in a internal combustion engine.

On May 31, 1912 the advertisement for the 1912 Columbia touring car appeared in THE WASHINGTON HERALD.

The 1912 Columbia touring car with Knight motor

Photo: MAY 31, 1912</p><br />
<p>Issued May 31, 1912</p><br />
<p>The Pope Manufacturing Company started making bicycles under the Columbia brand name in 1877. By 1896 it was the leading producer of bicycles in the US. In 1897 they started producing an electric automobile. By 1899 the Electric Vehicle division had spun off as the independent Columbia Automobile Company but it was acquired by the Electric Vehicle Company which had hoped to place electric powered cabs in every major US city. In 1910 the United States Motor Company was organized as a selling company to represent various manufacturers who were having trouble getting financial backing. These included : Maxwell, Stoddard-Dayton, Courier Car Company, Columbia Automobile Company, Brush Motor Car Company and Alden Sampson Trucks. In 1912 Columbia cars are still being turned out. A Knight motor was a type of engine that used sleeve valves instead of poppet valves in a internal combustion engine. </p><br />
<p>On May 31, 1912 the advertisement for the 1912 Columbia touring car.</p><br />
<p>The 1912 Columbia touring car with Knight motor

Wilbur Wright Dies 8 1/2 Years After Inventing Airplane

Wilbur Wright was in the printing business in Dayton, Ohio with his brother Orville. When the bicycle craze swept the US in the 1890’s, the brother’s opened a bicycle sales and repair shop. With the newly invented automobile and motorcycle, when you had problems with your vehicle, the usual two choices you had were the blacksmith or the bicycle shop. Bicycle men quickly became small motor experts and many early aviators started in bicycle shops. The Wrights had been interested in flight since reading about the experimental work of Otto Lilienthal in Germany. They gathered as much data as they could from current designers and developers and started their own experimentation in 1899. Wilbur seems to have been the driving force behind the effort writing of “my” machine and “my” plans before Orville became fully involved.

In 1900 the brothers journeyed to Kitty Hawk, North Carolina to begin their manned gliding experiments. The remote secluded area saw the Wrights performing gliding experiments from 1901 to 1903 but not the powered flights. In 1903 after experimenting with propellor design, the Wrights wrote to several engine manufacturers but none could meet their needs. They turned to their shop mechanic, Charlie Taylor, who built an engine to their specifications in just 6 weeks. To keep the weight low enough the engine block was cast from aluminum, a rare practice for the time. After a brief 3 second flight earlier in the week, on December 17, 1903 after winning a coin toss Orville Wright made 2 flights each from level ground into a freezing headwind gusting to 27MPH lasting 12 seconds at a speed of only 6.8 MPH.


Photograph of the first manned powered flight at Kitty Hawk – December 17, 1903

The only witnesses were 3 members of the local life station, a lumber salesman and a boy of 16. The feat was met with skepticism and vaguely reported in the newspapers. Their hometown paper, The Dayton Journal, refused to print the story. The Wrights invited the press for a demonstration a month later, but their two attempts at flight failed that day. Scientific American was offered the story but turned it down, wondering how newspapers, “alert as they are, allowed these sensational performances to escape their notice.” A newspaper publisher said years later “Frankly, none of us believed it.” With its importance never fully realized, the event was soon forgotten.

The Wrights were concerned with selling their invention to a “great Government” and protecting their copyrights. They refused to allow photographs of their flights. The Paris edition of the Herald Tribune headlined a 1906 article on the Wrights “FLYERS OR LIARS?” This suspicious protective attitude and litigious inclination distracted the Wrights from technological advance and alienated other aviators in particular and the public in general. (Their main rival Glenn Curtiss once stated that if a man jumped in the air and flapped his arms, he would be sued by the Wright brothers.) Since 1910 the Wrights were forever in court fighting patent wars with Curtiss and other airplane designers. Wilbur led the fight in the court battles traveling incessantly to consult with lawyers and testify in what he felt was a moral cause, particularly against Curtiss, who was creating a large company to manufacture aircraft. In April 1912 Wilbur contract typhoid fever in Boston.

On May 30, 1912 Wilbur Wright died in Dayton, Ohio. Orville Wright believed Curtiss was partly responsible for Wilbur’s premature death, which occurred in the wake of his exhausting travels and the stress of legal battles. Wilbur never married stating once that he “did not have time for both a wife and an airplane.”

Wilbur Wright, dead at 45 – May 30, 1912

Photo: MAY 30, 1912</p><br /><br />
<p>Wilbur Wright Dies 8 1/2 Years After Inventing Airplane</p><br /><br />
<p>Wilbur Wright was in the printing business in Dayton, Ohio with his brother Orville. When the bicycle craze swept the US in the 1890's, the brother's opened a bicycle sales and repair shop. With the newly invented automobile and motorcycle, when you had problems with your vehicle, the usual two choices you had were the blacksmith or the bicycle shop. Bicycle men quickly became small motor experts and many early aviators started in bicycle shops. The Wrights had been interested in flight since reading about the experimental work of Otto Lilienthal in Germany. They gathered as much data from current designers and developers and started their own experimentation in 1899. Wilbur seems to have been the driving force behind the effort writing of "my" machine and "my" plans before Orville became fully involved.</p><br /><br />
<p>In 1900 the brothers journeyed to Kitty Hawk, North Carolina to begin their manned gliding experiments. The remote secluded area saw the Wrights performing gliding experiments from 1901 to 1903  but not the powered flights. In 1903 after experimenting with propellor design, the Wrights wrote to several engine manufacturers but none could meet their needs. They turned to their shop mechanic, Charlie Taylor, who built an engine in just 6 weeks. To keep the weight low enough the engine block was cast from aluminum, a rare practice for the time. After a brief 3 second flight earlier in the week, on December 17, 1903 after winning a coin toss Orville Wright made 2 flights each from level ground into a freezing headwind gusting to 27MPH lasting 12 seconds at a speed of only 6.8 MPH.  </p><br /><br />
<p>Photograph of the first manned powered flight at Kitty Hawk - December 17, 1903 : http://www.wright-house.com/wright-brothers/wrights/photos/wright-flyer-300dpi-ltr-siz.jpg</p><br /><br />
<p>The only witnesses were 3 members of the local life station, a lumber salesman and a boy of 16. The feat was met with skepticism and vaguely reported in the newspapers. Their hometown paper, The Dayton Journal, refused to print the story. The Wrights invited the press for a demonstration a month later, but their two attempts at flight failed that day. Scientific American was offered the story but turned it down, wondering how newspapers, "alert as they are, allowed these sensational performances to escape their notice.” A newspaper publisher said years later “Frankly, none of us believed it.” With its importance never fully realized, the event was soon forgotten.</p><br /><br />
<p>The Wrights were concerned with selling their invention to a "great Government" and protecting their copyrights. They refused to allow photographs of their flights. The Paris edition of the Herald Tribune headlined a 1906 article on the Wrights "FLYERS OR LIARS?" This suspicious protective attitude and litigious inclination distracted the Wrights from technological advance and alienated other aviators in particular and the public in general. (Their main rival Glenn Curtiss once stated that if a man jumped in the air and flapped his arms, he would be sued by the Wright brothers.) Since 1910 the Wrights were forever in court fighting patent wars with Curtiss and other airplane designers. Wilbur led the fight in the court battles  traveling incessantly to consult with lawyers and testify in what he felt was a moral cause, particularly against Curtiss, who was creating a large company to manufacture aircraft. In April 1912 Wilbur contract typhoid fever in Boston. </p><br /><br />
<p>On May 30, 1912 Wilbur Wright died in Dayton, Ohio. Orville  Wright believed Curtiss was partly responsible for Wilbur's premature death, which occurred in the wake of his exhausting travels and the stress of legal battles. Wilbur never married  stating once that he "did not have time for both a wife and an airplane."</p><br /><br />
<p>Wilbur Wright, dead at 45 - May 30, 1912

Second Indianapolis 500

On May 30, 1912 the second Indianapolis 500 auto race was held at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indiana. Entries were required to sustain a speed of 75MPH for a full lap to qualify. Of 29 entries, 24 qualify for the race. This year riding mechanics must present and the $50,000 winner’s prize is double of last year’s prize. Ralph DePalma dominated of most of the race with a 5 1/2 lap lead and 11 minute advantage over second for 194 laps before suffering a mechanical failure. At lap 197 his Mercedes begins misfiring and on the 198th lap the car lost all power at the end of the backstretch as a broken connecting rod ripped a hole in the crankcase. Joe Dawson and riding mechanic Harry Martin who ran second for most of the race passed DePalma midway down the mainstretch to assume the lead and take the win.

Official program cover of the 1912 Indianapolis 500

Joe Dawson crosses the finish line in his blue and white National Motor Vehicle Company race car winning the 1912 Indianapolis 500 – May 30, 1912
Photo: MAY 30, 1912</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Second Indianapolis 500</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>On May 30, 1912 the second Indianapolis 500 auto race was held at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indiana. Entries must sustain a speed of 75MPH for a full lap to qualify. Of 29 entries, 24 qualify for the race. This years riding mechanics must present and the $50,000 winner's prize is double of last year's prize. </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Ralph DePalma dominated of most of the race with a 5 1/2 lap lead and 11 minute advantage over second for 194 laps before suffering a mechanical failure. At lap 197 his Mercedes begins misfiring and on the 198th lap the car lost all power at the end of the backstretch  as a broken connecting rod rips a hole in the crankcase. Joe Dawson and riding mechanic Harry Martin who ran second for most of the race passed DePalma midway down the mainstretch to assume the lead and take the win.</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Official program cover of the 1912 Indianapolis 500 : http://www.progcovers.com/motor/indianapolis12.jpg</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
<p>Joe Dawson crosses the finish line in his  blue and white National Motor Vehicle Company race car winning the 1912 Indianapolis 500 - May 30, 1912

Memorial Day 1912

After the Civil War veterans formed fraternal organizations to keep together the bonds of friendship and camaraderie formed during the war. The Grand Army of the Republic was founded in April 1866 for Union veterans on the principles of “Fraternity, Charity and Loyalty” in Decatur, Illinois. The GAR was organized into “Departments” at the state level and “Posts” at the community level, and military-style uniforms were worn by its members. There were posts in every state in the U.S. The GAR reached its largest enrollment in 1890, with 490,000 members.
The GAR became a powerful force in the Republican party promoting voting rights for African American veterans recognizing their patriotism. African American veterans shunned black veterans’ organizations in preference for racially inclusive groups such as the GAR. In the 1880s African American veterans joined in significant numbers and organized local posts but while the organization was advocating for federal pensions for veterans they failed to press the case for pensions for black soldiers. Most African American troops never received any pension or remuneration for wounds incurred during their service.
On May 30, 1912 the United States celebrated Memorial Day. It is also the 50th anniversary of the Civil War. African American members of the GAR marched in New York City.

African American Civil War veterans march on Memorial Day – May 30, 1912

Photo: MAY 30, 1912</p><br /><br /><br />
<p>Memorial Day 1912</p><br /><br /><br />
<p>After the Civil War veterans formed fraternal organizations to keep together the bonds of friendship and camaraderie formed during the war. The Grand Army of the Republic was founded in April 1866 for Union veterans on the principles of "Fraternity, Charity and Loyalty" in Decatur, Illinois. The GAR was organized into "Departments" at the state level and "Posts" at the community level, and military-style uniforms were worn by its members. There were posts in every state in the U.S. The GAR reached its largest enrollment in 1890, with 490,000 members. </p><br /><br /><br />
<p>The GAR became a powerful force in the Republican party promoting voting rights for African American veterans recognizing their patriotism. African American veterans shunned black veterans' organizations in preference for racially inclusive groups such as the GAR. In the 1880s African American veterans joined in significant numbers and organized local posts but while the organization was advocating for federal pensions for veterans they failed to press the case for pensions for black soldiers. Most African American troops never received any pension or remuneration for wounds incurred during their service. </p><br /><br /><br />
<p>On May 30, 1912 the United States celebrated Memorial Day. It is also the 50th anniversary of the Civil War. African American members of the GAR marched in New York City.</p><br /><br /><br />
<p>African American Civil War veterans march on Memorial Day - May 30, 1912

Issued May 30, 1912

LIFE magazine – Army and Navy NumberWalter Haskell Hinton was born in San Francisco, California in August 1886. In 1901 Hinton attended the Art Institute of Chicago. He lived most of his life in Chicago but spent some time in New York and Philadelphia. He was successful illustrator who worked in advertising and magazines such as LIFE as well as Western Story, Outdoor Life, and Successful Farming.

On May 30, 1912 he did a cover for LIFE that showed a sailor wooing a beautiful Indian woman.

“Nearest is Dearest”

Photo: MAY 30, 1912</p>
<p>Issued May 30, 1912</p>
<p>LIFE magazine - Army and Navy Number</p>
<p>Walter Haskell Hinton was born in San Francisco, California in August 1886. In 1901 Hinton attended the Art Institute of Chicago. He lived most of his life in Chicago but spent some time in New York and Philadelphia. He was successful illustrator who worked in advertising and magazines such as LIFE as well as Western Story, Outdoor Life, and Successful Farming.</p>
<p>On May 30, 1912 he did a cover for LIFE that showed a sailor wooing a beautiful Indian woman.</p>
<p>"Nearest is Dearest"

Ballet Russe Premiere Is A Dramatic Break With Tradition

It has been an exciting month for the Russian ballet troupe the Ballet Russe as it has premiere its new avant garde works in Paris.Le Dieu Bleuhttp://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=380802108622874&set=a.189903124379441.35396.189896404380113&type=3&theaterThamar

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=384908104878941&set=a.189903124379441.35396.189896404380113&type=3&theater

Parisian audiences are already a buzz with the controversial performances and await the Ballet Russe’s next premiere.

On May 29, 1912 L’APRES-MIDI D’UN FAUNE was premiered at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris set to Claude Debussy’s ‘Prelude a l’apres-midi d’un faune’ and inspired by the poem of the same title by Stephane Malarme. The ballet was choreographed by Daighilev’s young protege and the Ballet Russe rising star Vaslav Nijinsky dancing the role of the Faun. Design was by Leon Bakst. There was hardly any libretto since the story centered on a faun’s meeting and flirtation with nymphs, the first time this has been used in ballet. The 11 minute performance is designed to resemble scenes from Ancient Greek vase paintings. The ballet ends with Nijinsky making love to a scarf that the most desirable nymph has dropped as she ran away. Nijinsky’s suggestive sexual poses scandalize the audience and critics are harsh…”vile movements of erotic bestiality and gestures of heavy shamelessness.” Sculptor Auguste Rodin is in the audience and he vigorously defends the piece, planning to do a sculpture of Nijinsky as the Faun. Many consider this groundbreaking performance the birth of Modern Dance.

Leon Bakst’s illustration of Nijinsky as the Faun on the cover of the programme for the 1912 season of the Ballet Russes – May 1912
http://www.historytoday.com/sites/default/files/faune.jpg

Scene of Faun with Nymphs from L’APRES-MIDI D’UN FAUNE -1912 :http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5248/5274636007_2387664005.jpg

L’apres-midi d’un faune by Debussy :http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rbIzYgq0anU

Rodin’s sculpture of Nijinsky as the Faun – 1912 :http://hayhill.com/docs/rodin/full/r36g.jpg

Vaslav Nijinsky as the Faun in L’APRES-MIDI D’UN FAUNE – May 1912

Photo: MAY 29, 1912</p><br /><br />
<p>Ballet Russe Premiere Is A Dramatic Break With Tradition</p><br /><br />
<p>It has been an exciting month for the Russian ballet troupe the Ballet Russe as it has premiere its new avant garde works in Paris.</p><br /><br />
<p>Le Dieu Bleu</p><br /><br />
<p>http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=380802108622874&set=a.189903124379441.35396.189896404380113&type=3&theater</p><br /><br />
<p>Thamar</p><br /><br />
<p>http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=384908104878941&set=a.189903124379441.35396.189896404380113&type=3&theater</p><br /><br />
<p>Parisian audiences are already a buzz with the controversial performances and await the Ballet Russe's next premiere.</p><br /><br />
<p>On May 29, 1912 L'APRES-MIDI D'UN FAUNE was premiered at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris set to Claude Debussy's 'Prelude a l'apres-midi d'un faune' and inspired by the poem of the same title by Stephane Malarme. The ballet was choreographed by Daighilev's young protege and the Ballet Russe rising star Vaslav Nijinsky dancing the role of the Faun. Design was by Leon Bakst. There was hardly any libretto since the story centered on a faun's meeting and flirtation with nymphs, the first time this has been used in ballet. The 11 minute performance is designed to resemble scenes from Ancient Greek vase paintings. The ballet ends with Nijinsky making love to a scarf that the most desirable nymph has dropped as she ran away. Nijinsky's suggestive sexual poses scandalize the audience and critics are harsh..."vile movements of erotic bestiality and gestures of heavy shamelessness." Sculptor Auguste Rodin is in the audience and he vigorously defends the piece, planning to do a sculpture of Nijinsky as the Faun. Many consider this groundbreaking performance the birth of Modern Dance.</p><br /><br />
<p>Leon Bakst's illustration of Nijinsky as the Faun on the cover of the programme for the 1912 season of the Ballet Russes - May 1912<br /><br /><br />
http://www.historytoday.com/sites/default/files/faune.jpg</p><br /><br />
<p>Scene of Faun with Nymphs from L'APRES-MIDI D'UN FAUNE -1912 :http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5248/5274636007_2387664005.jpg</p><br /><br />
<p>L'apres-midi d'un faune by Debussy : http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=rbIzYgq0anU</p><br /><br />
<p>Rodin's sculpture of Nijinsky as the Faun - 1912 : http://hayhill.com/docs/rodin/full/r36g.jpg</p><br /><br />
<p>Vaslav Nijinsky as the Faun in L'APRES-MIDI D'UN FAUNE - May 1912

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