100 Years Ago Today

A History Of Events And Happenings From Exactly One Hundred Years Ago

Captain And Crew of the RMS CARPATHIA Receive Awards

Margaret Tobin “Molly” Brown was a passenger on the RMS TITANIC.

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Brown was in bed reading a book when RMS TITANIC struck the iceberg. Where others hardly felt the impact, Brown claims the impact threw her to the floor. She put on 6 pairs of wool stockings, a wool suit, fur coat, hat and muff. She put $500 cash in one pocket and a good luck amulet she had purchased recently on her Egyptian tour in her other pocket. After helping other women into a lifeboat, Brown herself entered lifeboat No. 6. Brown took charge and grabbed the oars ordering the women to row away from the doomed liner. She was appalled when the officer in charge refused to turn the lifeboat back to pick up more survivors. Brown shared her extra pairs of stockings. Once on board the RMS CARPATHIA she helped organize relief efforts. On board, she organized and established the Titanic’s Survivors Committee for the people that needed help and for the poor steerage passengers who lost everything raising almost $10,000 dollars from wealthy survivors. Her knowledge of foreign languages enabled her to aid the frightened immigrants who had lost everything, including their husbands. Margaret visited Nova Scotia to place wreaths on the victims graves and continued to serve the Titanic’s Survivors Committee.

The Cunard Lines RMS CARPATHIA was the only ship to pick up survivors of the RMS TITANIC.

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Captain Arthur Henry Rostron was the brave and gallant captain of the RMS CARPATHIA. His efforts saved many lives and made the survivors of the RMS TITANIC as comfortable as possible.

On May 29, 1912, The RMS CARPATHIA returned to New York from Naples, her first journey since the dramatic rescue. Once the passengers had left the ship with their baggage Captain Rostron issued orders for all hands to muster in the first-class dining saloon. 250 members of the old crew lined up in the saloon in two long lines as chair of the Survivor’s Committee Margaret Brown presented a silver loving cup to Captain Rostron of the Carpathia and a gold, silver and bronze medals to each Carpathia crew member. Officers, cooks and soot-covered boiler men mingled as medals were handed out and the cup presented to Captain Rostron which read:

Presented to Capt. A. H. Rostron, R. N. R., commander of the R. M. S. Carpathia.

In grateful recognition and appreciation of his heroism and efficient service in the rescue of the survivors of the Titanic on April 15, 1912, and of the generous and sympathetic treatment he accorded us on his ship.

FROM SURVIVORS OF THE TITANIC

The medals bore in bas relief a copy of the Carpathia at full speed going to the rescue of the Titanic’s victims, while the reverse side bore the following inscription:

Presented to the Captain and crew of the R. M. S. Carpathia in recognition of their gallant and heroic services, from the survivors of the S. S. Titanic, April 15, 1912.

Bronze medal presented to RMS CARPATHIA’s crew on May 29, 1912 : http://images.encyclopedia-titanica.org/files/admin/images/carpathia-crew-medal-bonhams2.jpg

A framed set of resolutions from the women survivors that were proposed in the saloon on the night of April 17, before they reached New York thanking to the entire crew of the Carpathia, was placed beside the loving cup. Captain Rostron seemed overcome by the applause and recognition. He mustered enough composure to reply :

“I do not know how to express my thanks for this tribute, for the honor you have accorded me, for the many compliments you have paid me, and for the kind things you have said in presenting me with this cup of good fellowship. All I can say is that, first, I tried to do my duty as a sailor; second, I tried to do it toward suffering humanity.

“But I will not take the credit for the achievement of that night when we went to the aid of the people of the Titanic. I do not deserve this credit. My crew does deserve it, and to them I want to give my heartfelt thanks for their loyalty, valor, and fidelity to the trust that was imposed. I cannot think of them too highly for they have brought this honor to me and to themselves, and I feel humbly proud of what has been done for me through their valor.”

Margaret “Molly” Brown as chair of the Titanic Survivors Committee presents a silver loving cup to RMS CARPATHIA’s Captain Arthur Rostron in New York City – May 29, 1912

Photo: MAY 29, 1912

Captain And Crew of the RMS CARPATHIA Receive Awards

Margaret Tobin "Molly" Brown was a passenger on the RMS TITANIC.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=351753624861056&set=a.189903124379441.35396.189896404380113&type=3&theater

Brown was in bed reading a book when RMS TITANIC struck the iceberg. Where others hardly felt the impact, Brown claims the impact threw her to the floor. She put on 6 pairs of wool stockings, a wool suit, fur coat, hat and muff. She put $500 cash in one pocket and a good luck amulet she had purchased recently on her Egyptian tour in her other pocket. After helping other women into a lifeboat, Brown herself entered lifeboat No. 6. Brown took charge and grabbed the oars ordering the women to row away from the doomed liner. She was appalled when the officer in charge refused to turn the lifeboat back to pick up more survivors. Brown shared her extra pairs of stockings. Once on board the RMS CARPATHIA she helped organize relief efforts. On board, she organized and established the Titanic's Survivors Committee for the people that needed help and for the poor steerage passengers who lost everything raising almost $10,000 dollars from wealthy survivors. Her knowledge of foreign languages enabled her to aid the frightened immigrants who had lost everything, including their husbands. Margaret visited Nova Scotia to place wreaths on the victims graves and continued to serve the Titanic's Survivors Committee.

The Cunard Lines RMS CARPATHIA was the only ship to pick up survivors of the RMS TITANIC.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=363197543716664&set=a.189903124379441.35396.189896404380113&type=3&theater

Captain Arthur Henry Rostron was the brave and gallant captain of the RMS CARPATHIA. His efforts saved many lives and made the survivors of the RMS TITANIC as comfortable as possible.

On May 29, 1912, The RMS CARPATHIA returned to New York from Naples, her first journey since the dramatic rescue. Once the passengers had left the ship with their baggage Captain Rostron issued orders for all hands to muster in the first-class dining saloon. 250 members of the old crew lined up in the saloon in two long lines as chair of the Survivor's Committee Margaret Brown presented a silver loving cup to Captain Rostron of the Carpathia and a gold, silver and bronze medals to each Carpathia crew member. Officers, cooks and soot-covered boiler men mingled as medals were handed out and the cup presented to Captain Rostron which read:

Presented to Capt. A. H. Rostron, R. N. R., commander of the R. M. S. Carpathia.

In grateful recognition and appreciation of his heroism and efficient service in the rescue of the survivors of the Titanic on April 15, 1912, and of the generous and sympathetic treatment he accorded us on his ship.

FROM SURVIVORS OF THE TITANIC

The medals bore in bas relief a copy of the Carpathia at full speed going to the rescue of the Titanic's victims, while the reverse side bore the following inscription:

Presented to the Captain and crew of the R. M. S. Carpathia in recognition of their gallant and heroic services, from the survivors of the S. S. Titanic, April 15, 1912.

Bronze medal presented to RMS CARPATHIA's crew on May 29, 1912 : http://images.encyclopedia-titanica.org/files/admin/images/carpathia-crew-medal-bonhams2.jpg

A framed set of resolutions from the women survivors that were proposed in the saloon on the night of April 17, before they reached New York thanking to the entire crew of the Carpathia, was placed beside the loving cup. Captain Rostron seemed overcome by the applause and recognition. He mustered enough composure to reply : 

“I do not know how to express my thanks for this tribute, for the honor you have accorded me, for the many compliments you have paid me, and for the kind things you have said in presenting me with this cup of good fellowship. All I can say is that, first, I tried to do my duty as a sailor; second, I tried to do it toward suffering humanity.

“But I will not take the credit for the achievement of that night when we went to the aid of the people of the Titanic. I do not deserve this credit. My crew does deserve it, and to them I want to give my heartfelt thanks for their loyalty, valor, and fidelity to the trust that was imposed. I cannot think of them too highly for they have brought this honor to me and to themselves, and I feel humbly proud of what has been done for me through their valor."

Margaret "Molly" Brown as chair of the Titanic Survivors Committee presents a silver loving cup to RMS CARPATHIA's Captain Arthur Rostron in New York City - May 29, 1912
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