100 Years Ago Today

A History Of Events And Happenings From Exactly One Hundred Years Ago

Recorded February 5, 1915

The first known recording of Mexican music was in 1908 of the mariachi group Cuarteto Coculense from Cocula, Jalisco recorded in Mexico City in 1908. Since the Revolution of 1911 much music has been used as corridos, a popular style of narrative song and poetry or a ballad that spread communication throughout Mexico as a response to the propaganda being spread in the newspapers which were owned by the corrupt government. Sheet music of popular corridos was sold or passed out free as a form of propaganda, to eulogize leaders, armies, and political movements, or in some cases to mock the opposition. The best known Revolutionary corrido is, of course, La cucaracha, an old song that was rephrased to celebrate the exploits of Pancho Villa’s army and poke fun at his nemesis Venustiano Carranza.

A corrido song sheet of LA CUCARACHA issued recently during the Mexican Revolution. Note the original lyrics and the reference to cartoncitos, which were a type of scrip issued as pay.

A corrido song sheet of LA CUCARACHA issued recently during the Mexican Revolution. Note the original lyrics and the reference to cartoncitos, which were a type of scrip issued as pay.

The US record manufacturers makes product for this market as well. They produce music for Mexican buyers even though the performers are not Mexican.

On February 5, 1915 The Victor Band, house orchestra for the Victor Recording Company went into their studios in Camden, New Jersey with ten extra musicians and recorded four instrumental song for import to Mexico – Carridada, Las Tres Pelonas, Noche Blanca, and this piece Tres Perdras. Although no one in the group was Mexican, they called themselves Banda Rodriquez, perhaps to help sales in Mexico.

http://adp.library.ucsb.edu/index.php/matrix/detail/700000658/B-15674-Tres_piedras

Advertisements

Single Post Navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: