100 Years Ago Today

A History Of Events And Happenings From Exactly One Hundred Years Ago

Archive for the category “Art”

Published January 29, 1915

The Western Mail was founded in Cardiff, Wales in 1869 as a penny daily paper. It is the most populat newspaper in Wales.

Two days ago, Kaiser Wilhem of Germany celebrated his 56th birthday. Since the beginning of the war in Europe, one of the Kaiser’s many honorific titles was ‘Supreme War Lord’. Here cartoonist for The Western Mail Joseph Morewood Staniforth changed the title to a more satirical ‘Great High War Lord’. It depicts the change in the Kaiser’s fortunes after releasing his army in 1914, represented by an enthusiastic dachshund. The dachshund has returned exhausted with decrepit army boot presented to his dismayed master inscribed with the recent defeats to Germany.

MAD WILHELM: Good dog! Go and fetch your Great High War Lord a splendid victory as a birthday present. MAD WILHELM: Mein Gott! Do you call this a splendid victory?

MAD WILHELM: Good dog! Go and fetch your Great High War Lord a splendid victory as a birthday present. MAD WILHELM: Mein Gott! Do you call this a splendid victory?

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Issued January 14, 1915

Rea Irvin

Rea Irvin

Rea Irvin studied at the Mark Hopkins Art Institute in San Francisco and started his career as an unpaid cartoonist for The San Francisco Examiner. In 1906 he moved to the East Coast and by 1910 he was contributing many illustrations to both Red Book magazine and its sister publication, Green Book. Irvin contributed illustrations regularly to Life, and rose to the position of art editor. Irvin also contributed to Cosmopolitan.

On January 14, 1915 Rea Irvin’s cartoon showing German aggression during the war appeared in LIFE magazine.

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Painting the Brooklyn Bridge

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Eugene de Salignac was born in Boston in 1861 into an eccentric family of exiled French nobility. In 1903, at the age of 42, his brother-in-law found him a job as an assistant to the photographer for the Department of Bridges, Joseph Palmer. After 3 years of apprenticeship, Palmer suddenly died, and in October 1906, de Salignac assumed his duties.

As the sole photographer for the department, he documented the creation of the city’s modern infrastructure—including bridges, major municipal buildings, roads and subways. Most notably, he documented the construction of the Manhattan Bridge and the Queensboro Bridge, and the Manhattan Municipal Building.

On January 3, 1915 de Salignac took this photo of bridge workers painting the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City, New York.

Advertised January 11, 1913

William Vincent Cahill was born in Syracuse, New York in 1878. He began his studies of art at the Art Students League in New York learning from Howard Pyle and then went on to study in Boston, Massachusetts. He moved to New York and is a successful illustrator for magazines and advertisers.

Tom Amidon was the head miller for a small grain mill in North Dakota. In 1893 the mill was on the verge of closing when when Amidon who had begun making a wheat-based hot breakfast cereal for his family, suggested to the other millers that they try selling it. Amidon coined the porridge Cream of Wheat because it was made from the “cream of the crop.” The product made its debut at the 1893 World Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois.  The cereal became very popular. In 1900 boxes featured the image of a African-American chef  named Rastus developed by artist Edward V Brewer.  It has been suggested that  a chef named Frank L White from a popular Chicago restaurant was photographed in 1900 and was the model for Rastus.

In the January 11, 1913 issue of THE SATURDAY EVENING POST, an advertisement for Cream Of Wheat appeared with artwork by William V Cahill.

"Breakfast's Ready Li'l Missy"

“Breakfast’s Ready Li’l Missy”

Parfums Lubin is one of the oldest perfume manufacturers in the world.  Pierre Francois Lubin founded the company in 1798 and his fragrances won over the Imperial Court and was worn by the likes of Josephine Bonaparte. When the Bourbons were restored, Lubin dedicated his fragrances to Queen Marie-Amelie. Eventually Lubin’s perfumes were worn by all the crowned heads of Europe, and were imported to America in 1830.

In the January 11, 1913 issue of LA VIE PARISIANNE, Parfum Lubin advertised it’s new scent – “Chrysantheme” with an alluring exotic nude.

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Issued January 11, 1913

Since 1902 COLLIERS WEEKLY magazine has had a yearly Automobile Number highlighting the latest developments in automotive design. It has been singularly helpful in promoting the fledgling industry. The 1913 offering is presented in it’s own separate Automotive section.

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SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN featured a color cover showing the assembly of automobiles. The contents focused on the automobile industry including many photos and related car ads.

SCIENTIFIC AMERICANJanuary 11, 1913

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN
January 11, 1913

Robert Robinson was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania in 1886. He studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and from 1909 to 1912 with the famous illustrator, Howard Pyle. He moved to New York to be near magazine publishers and helped originate the Saturday Evening Post’s “Slice of Life” style of cover art. Robinson’s typical work focused on rural men “old geezer” types. On January 11, 1913 Robinson featured his “old man” taking the grandma on a fast ride in an automobile.

SATURDAY EVENING POSTJanuary 11, 1913

SATURDAY EVENING POST
January 11, 1913

 

 

New Comic Strip Debuts In New York

George McManus was born in St. Louis, Missouri in January 1884. After being sent home for drawing in class, his father brought him to the local newspaper for a job as an errand boy. It is there he drew his first comic strip ALMA AND OLIVER. In 1904 McManus moved to New York City where he worked for several publications and created the first American family strip, THE NEWLYWEDS about an elegant young couple and their baby Snookums. The popularity of the strip prompted The New York American to invite McManus to join their paper in 1912.

On January 2, 1913 MaManus introduced a new comic strip BRINGING UP FATHER. McManus was inspired by a musical comedy he saw as a child called “The Rising Generation” where a fat Irish-American bricklayer Martin McShayne becomes a wealthy contractor. His society-minded wife and daughter were ashamed of him and his lowbrow buddies prompting McShayne to sneak out to join his pals for poker. In BRINGING UP FATHER, an Irishman named Jiggs doesn’t understand why his ascension to wealth via the Irish Sweepstakes means he can’t hang out with his friends, and his nagging, social-climbing wife, Maggie.

Jiggs of BRINGING UP FATHER

Jiggs of BRINGING UP FATHER

Issued January 2, 1913

LIFE is a weekly magazine published since January 1883. A revolutionary new printing process using zinc-coated plates improved the reproduction of illustrations and artwork and allowed LIFE to compete with established magazines like JUDGE and PUCK. “We wish to have some fun in this paper… We shall try to domesticate as much as possible of the casual cheerfulness that is drifting about in an unfriendly world… “. It became a place to introduce new illustrators like Charles Dana Gibson who introduced his iconic figure “The Gibson Girl” in LIFE.

Charles Dana Gibson was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts in September 1867. He was enrolled by his parents in New York’s Art Students League and sold his first illustration to LIFE magazine in 1886.He quickly became popular and contributed to every major New York publication such as Harper’s Weekly, Scribners and Collier’s as well as major newspapers. In 1890 he began developing “The Gibson Girl”, an iconic female face and figure that typified the style of women at the time based on his wife Irene Langhorne and her sister.

On January 2, 1913 LIFE magazine celebrated its 30 year anniversary by publishing the Birthday Number using artwork by Gibson from drawing he did in 1907 titled THE STORY OF HIS LIFE.

THE STORY OF HIS LIFE by Charles Dana Gibson1907

THE STORY OF HIS LIFE by Charles Dana Gibson
1907

The caption of the January 2, 1913 LIFE magazine cover reads: “The story of his life : Once upon a time, thirty years ago….”

courtesy of 2neat.com – seller of vintage magazines

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Issued January 1, 1913

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Les Dames et Les Modes – Vol. 2  No. 22

January 1, 1913

Children’s fashion

Leighton Budd is an illustrator who has worked for PUCK magazine for many years. He is also a cartoonist and appears in many Sunday Comics sections.

19130101(2A)PUCK magazine – January 1, 1913

Issued December 14, 1912

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Supplement
December 14, 1912

Whaling Expedition In Korea
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Charles Dana Gibson was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts in September 1867. He was enrolled by his parents in New York’s Art Students League and sold his first illustration to LIFE magazine in 1886.He quickly became popular and contributed to every major New York publication such as Harper’s Weekly, Scribners and Collier’s as well as major newspapers. In 1890 he began developing “The Gibson Girl”, an iconic female face and figure that typified the style of women at the time based on his wife Irene Langhorne and her sister.

On December 14, 1912 Gibson drew the cover art for COLLIER’S FOR CHRISTMAS.

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Issued December 12, 1912

Charles Clyde Squires was born in August 1882 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His uncle was a landscape painter and at age 13 he was apprenticed to an engraving company. His art was published in the DESERET NEWS in 1898 and in 1900 he went to New York City to study at the New York School of Art. In October 1905 he studied with Howard Pyle. Pyle sent him to the offices of Life with a letter of introduction and suggestion that they publish his drawings. In 1906 his work began to be published in popular nationwide magazines, such as Life and Everybody’s Magazine, after which he appeared in Judge, Success, Woman’s Home Companion, and St. Nicholas Magazine.

On December 12, 1912 LIFE magazine used Squires painting of a nighttime winter scene showing horse waiting at hitching rail while young man visits his girl.
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“They Also Serve Who Only Stand And Wait”
LIFE magazine
December 12, 1912
cover art by C Clyde Squires

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